Lina Sofia is a textile artist who investigates art processes in relationship to a place, material and knowledge. She is based in the countryside of Sweden where she explores natural dyes, cultivating dye plants and natural fibers. While working she is incoporating local skills from the community by including neighbours, old and new friends in the activities around cultivating and crafting. She is trying to find out how information transforms itself from theory to knowledge and how it can be embodied. The social platforms she builds is an essential part in her projects.

The natural dyeing techniques have for a long time had a history of keeping expert skills as secrets. Lina Sofia wanted to open up the field which led her to teaching and lecturing in the subject, also the publications The Dyeing Manifest – The Expanded Field of Composting 2013, Natural Dyes 2014 and 2017.

Between 2009-2016 Lina Sofia investigated collborative consumption through a shared wardrobe in a shape of a clothes library. The project dealed with issues around mending, life span of garments, ecology, human behavior and also created a space for new ideas to be born within the circularity of materials. It was located in the suburb of Stockholm and had 360 members.

Since 2016 she is working for the Swedish Public Art Agency in a residential area in a nearby city with a great diversity of residents. The municipality plan a new urban district park, a new square and the existing houses are being renovetad. Cooking, textiles and dyeing with spices and plants have been the starting point for dialogues about public spaces and an investigation on how they can connect with the location. She recently presented her ideas about an interactive public art piece placed in the park with the aim to be produced during 2018.

Lina Sofia has a BA degree in Textile Art from the Academy of Art and Craft in Gothenburg, Craft Tutor from Nyckelviksskolan in Stockholm and studied Ethnology at the University in Stockholm.

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